Frequent Hand-Washing Tough on Those With Eczema

Hand-washing is one of the best ways to prevent the spread of COVID-19 and other viruses, but for people with skin conditions like eczema, lathering up frequently can lead to dryness, cracking, itchiness, pain and even an infection.

If you’re struggling to balance pandemic hand-washing and skin conditions, Dr. Jonathan Silverberg, a dermatologist at George Washington University School of Medicine in Washington, D.C., offers some advice.

Regular washing is better than hand sanitizer: When you cleanse with soap and water, then immediately apply moisturizer, you can “offset much of the drying effects of hand-washing,” Silverberg said in a news release from the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America. He recommends carrying a pocket tube of moisturizer so you can apply it on the go.

Avoid antiseptic and antibacterial soaps: You may not need them, as long as you scrub thoroughly with soap for at least 20 seconds and then rinse.

Moisturize properly: After washing, pat your hands until they are mostly dry, using a paper towel or tissue. “Once mostly dry, [i.e., your skin is still a little damp] apply a generous amount of moisturizer to coat the entire surface of your hands and fingers,” Silverberg said.

Beware of gloves plus sanitizer: To avoid irritation from hand-washing, some people with skin conditions wear disposable gloves and then use sanitizer on them — an approach Silverberg does not recommend. “When we apply hand sanitizer on our bare skin, we can feel if we covered the entire surface of the hands and fingers,” he said. “But when wearing gloves, we limit the ability to feel this and might miss some spots on the gloves and then accidentally carry some germs.” It makes more sense to change gloves and/or wash or sanitize hands often, Silverberg said.

Wear gloves when cleaning: Cleaning products are especially harsh on the skin. “People should always wear gloves when using antiseptic wipes and cleaning products,” Silverberg said.

Sterilize containers: If you carry bottles of soap and moisturizer with you, clean and sterilize the containers to remove harmful germs. And remember: Moisturizer should not be applied unless hands are clean, to prevent contaminating the product.
There’s more about hand hygiene at the National Eczema Association.

By Serena McNiff, HealthDay Reporter
Aug. 21, 2020
Copyright © 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


More than 800 million students worldwide lack hand washing amenities

More than 40 per cent of students worldwide – around 818 million – lack access to basic hand-washing facilities in the classroom.

But hand hygiene provision is a key requirement for the safe reopening of schools, claim the World Health Organisation (WHO) and UNICEF.

According to UN data there are currently 1.6 billion students worldwide in 190 countries, 43 per cent of whom lack access to soap or water or both. A third of these pupils live in sub-Saharan Africa and in the least developed countries, seven out of 10 schools lack basic hand-washing facilities.

The World Health Organisation and UNICEF have teamed up to issue a report setting out guidelines for the safe reopening of schools this autumn.

“Access to water, sanitation and hygiene services are essential for effective infection prevention and control in all settings, including schools,” said WHO general manager Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus. “It must be a major focus of government strategies for the safe reopening and operation of schools during the ongoing COVID-19 global pandemic.”

The report encourages governments to balance any public health measures against the social and economic impacts of student lockdowns. And it cites substantial evidence of the negative impacts of prolonged school closures on children.

“Global school closures since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic have presented an unprecedented challenge to children’s education and well-being,” said UNICEF executive director Henrietta Fore. “We must prioritise children’s learning and ensure that schools are safe to reopen – with access to hand hygiene, clean drinking water and safe sanitation.”

Published 24th of August 2020
http://www.europeancleaningjournal.com


COVID-19 Hand Hygiene and Dry Skin: 3 Tips for Reducing the Risk of Dry and Cracked Hands

We have been regularly washing our hands for over 20 seconds (while humming the “Happy Birthday” song!) for months now. When there are no handwashing facilities, we have been rubbing our hands with dollops of alcohol-based hand sanitizers to keep them virus-free.

A rather unpleasant complexity of these regular vigorous hand washing and sanitizing is that they tend to make our hands excessively dry and irritated. This is due to the high percentages of alcohol in hand sanitizers and the soaps stripping off the natural oils in our skin. Dry skin in hands should not be ignored since it can lead to irritations and breakage of skin.

This should not mean you should cut back on hand hygiene! One of the easiest ways to prevent dry hands is to use a moisturizer or a hand sanitizer with moisturizing agents. Puracy’s Alcohol-Based Gel Hand Sanitizer keeps your hands germ-free, and its gel consistency with moisturizing agents help keep your skin well hydrated and smooth, preventing dry and cracked hands.
Get Your Puracy’s Citrus and Sea Salt Gel Hand Sanitizer Here!

Important: Even if your hands feel dry, it’s extremely important to keep washing your hands regularly to protect yourself and others against COVID-19. You can regain the skin’s moisture barrier by following the tips below.

1. Use Lukewarm Water To Wash Hands

Washing your hands with lukewarm water is more effective in two ways. The heat helps easily break down any oils and dirt along with any infected respiratory droplets that you may have touched. Lukewarm water helps properly break down the soap for its maximum efficacy, and wash off completely without leaving any traces that can cause dry skin.

2. Use an Occlusive Moisturizer Immediately After Washing Hands

Occlusive agents in moisturizers such as waxes, oils, silicones, and petrolatum increase the overall moisture of your skin by providing a physical barrier to your epidermal water loss. Once you finish washing your hands, pat them dry, and immediately use an occlusive moisturizer to lock in the moisture. Keep a bottle of moisturizer in your bag and nearby your regular sink to help you remember to moisturize each time you wash your hands.

3. Use a Fragrance-Free, Moisturizing Hand Sanitizer

While a whiff of fragrance may be pleasant when you use your hand sanitizer, the aromatic chemicals used to create a fragrance in sanitizing products can further dry and irritate your skin. Especially since you are using sanitizer regularly these days, even the smallest amounts of added chemicals can cause damage eventually.

CDC recommends using hand sanitizers with 60-95% alcohol. While this ensures maximum protection for you, it can also be quite drying. Therefore, look for a hydrating or moisturizing component in your hand sanitizer to reduce dryness. ArtNaturals scent-free hand sanitizer comes with 62.5% alcohol content, and it’s infused with botanical extracts including aloe, jojoba and vitamin E to nourish and protect your skin from damage.

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Improving Hand Hygiene Requires a Multi-Modal Approach

As hospitals reopen services, patients are seeking assurances the facility has made their well-being a priority from the moment they walk in the door.

Studies show patients feel safer knowing that their healthcare providers’ hand hygiene is being monitored.1 Hand Hygiene (HH) is a simple task performed in a complex environment. It is one of the most foundational aspects of patient safety that spans across all hierarchies and disciplines and there is much room for improvement in virtually every healthcare organization. The gold standard metric for measuring compliance has been direct observation (DO). However, less than 1% of all HH opportunities are captured.

Monitoring hand hygiene performance and providing personnel with feedback on their performance are essential elements of successful improvement programs. Recognizing that unit leadership and frontline healthcare workers (HCW) are closest to the patient – who better to speak up and provide the immediate reminders when hand hygiene opportunities are missed? To this end, many hospitals also have their infection preventionists or other hand hygiene team members serve as coaches, or just-in-time (JIT) coaches, who stop HCW when they observe a missed opportunity and have a conversation about contributing factors for noncompliance and provide education on hand hygiene protocols. While extremely valuable, this coaching occurs sporadically and often exclusively during dayshift, not on off-shifts and weekends. Considering the many opportunities for hand hygiene, the current system simply isn’t providing HCW with what they need to make hand hygiene a ritual, automatic behavior-– consistent immediate feedback.

Unit-led-just-in-time-coaching may very well be the key to providing consistent (24/7), nonpunitive, on-the-spot feedback when hand hygiene noncompliance is observed. Real-time identification of hand hygiene misses along with direct individual accountability have been shown to improve compliance.2,3 As hospitals seek to maximize resources, it is critical to find efficiencies that save time and reduce waste without detracting from patient care. Electronic compliance monitoring (ECM) systems provide the resources to track, monitor, and develop data-driven solutions. ECMs track soap and sanitizer dispenser activations (events) and room entries and exits (opportunities) to provide real-time performance metrics on staff, patients and visitors and captures data 24/7. The purpose of any ECM is to collect data about hand hygiene events and provide feedback to staff so that they can use it to change and improve their practices. Understanding how the ECM system works and having trust in the validity of the data generated is critical for staff buy-in and behavior change.

By Megan J. DiGiorgio and Lori Moore
Published August 12, 2020
www.healthleadersmedia.com


Almost half of children not using proper hand hygiene at school

A new survey has revealed that almost half of children aged five to 10 years old are not practising proper hand hygiene by using soap when washing their hands at school.

The survey, conducted by The Global Hygiene Council (GHC), has found how 42% of children are not following proper hand hygiene procedures in school by using soap when they wash their hands. It assessed primary school children’s hygiene awareness and habits across seven countries during COVID-19 and, in all countries, usage of soap was higher at home than in school settings.

Leading hygiene experts are now stressing the importance of effective hand hygiene measures and education in schools as children begin returning to educational settings following the COVID-19 pandemic.

Hand hygiene

The survey showed that at schools, less than half of children (44%) said that someone ensures they always wash their hands prior to eating, with the vast majority (71%) stating this happens at home.

Commenting on the survey findings of Infectious Diseases at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis said: “As children slowly begin returning to schools around the world, the focus on improved hygiene should not just be a short-term measure.

“Whilst COVID-19 has increased public awareness of the importance of hand hygiene in stopping the spread of respiratory infections, basic hygiene measures such as handwashing are also essential in preventing the spread of common illnesses including gastrointestinal infections, such as diarrhoea.”

Controlling infections in school settings

The experts emphasised the importance of supplying schools with hand soap, as on average, only 60% of children stated that soap was always available in school settings, with one in 10 stating that soap was never available.

Schools are places where infections can easily spread, and the adoption of a targeted hygiene approach offers a way to maximise protection against this.

A recent paper, published in the American Journal of Infection Control, highlighted that improved everyday hygiene practices, such as hand-washing, reduces the risk of common infections by up to 50% and the need for antibiotics by up to 30%.

Studies in school settings with appropriate hand hygiene, in combination with surface disinfection, have indicated a positive impact on illness rates.

Professor Sally Bloomfield from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine said: “Targeted hygiene means focussing hygiene practices in places and at times – known as ‘risk moments’ – when harmful microbes are most likely to spread. The key risk moments at schools include food handling, using the toilet and touching surfaces frequently touched by others.”

Dr Gandra added: “Whilst the majority of children may know that they should be washing their hands, many are not actually putting it into practice, so there is a clear gap in educating them about the importance of handwashing.”

“It is essential that healthy hygiene habits, such as washing hands for 20 seconds with soap and water, are ingrained into the next generation to help prevent the spread of future outbreaks and to protect families from other common infections.”

Published: 8th July 2020
https://www.healtheuropa.eu


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By sales@researchnreports.com
Published: July 12, 2020

https://3wnews.org


Decline in foodborne outbreaks likely due to COVID-19 measures

More than four times fewer suspected food and waterborne epidemics have been reported in Finland in the past few months.

Between March and May, four suspected foodborne outbreaks were reported, compared with an average of 18 in previous years, according to the Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare (THL).

The agency believes this is because of the coronavirus pandemic and associated limitations and recommendations. When hands are washed diligently and food is prepared for smaller groups, there are fewer epidemics, the THL reported.

Suspected pathogens in the four outbreaks are Campylobacter, Yersinia, and norovirus.

Ruska Rimhanen-Finne, an epidemiologist at THL, said as summer comes, cooking and eating out will increase.

“The most important way to avoid food poisoning also applies in summer: always wash your hands thoroughly before cooking and eating. Also remember to wash vegetables, cook meat and take care of good food handling and storage practices.”

A common picture
More than 130 foodborne outbreaks were recorded in Finland between 2014 and 2016, according to an earlier report published in 2019.

Norovirus remained the most common agent and was responsible for 42 outbreaks. There was one Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and five Campylobacter outbreaks reported in that period.

The picture in Finland reflects reports elsewhere. Rates of Campylobacter and Salmonella infections in Australia have fallen since a lockdown was imposed because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Experts in the United Kingdom and Ireland urged caution in interpreting a decline in foodborne illness figures during the coronavirus outbreak as an actual drop in infections while a Dutch report found people are paying more attention to hygiene in the kitchen.

Researchers at the National Food Institute in Denmark are testing a hypothesis that Danes’ increased focus on hand hygiene and changes in what they eat and who prepares the food will lead to a decrease in foodborne illness cases.I am text block. Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.

 

By Joe Whitworth
Published June 17, 2020
https://www.foodsafetynews.com


How better home hygiene could curb antibiotic resistance

Pharmacologists and infectious disease specialists say there is an urgent need to promote good hygiene in the home and in community settings. They believe that this will be essential in reducing antibiotic use and preventing the spread of drug-resistant bacteria in the coming years.

Rates of resistance to commonly used antibiotics have already reached 40–60% in some countries outside the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and are set to continue rising fast.

In OECD countries, rates of resistance could reach nearly 1 in 5 (or 18%) by 2030 for eight different bacterium-antibiotic combinations.

By 2050, about 10 million people could die each year as a result of resistance to antimicrobial agents.

While policymakers usually focus on hygiene in healthcare settings, such as hospitals, a group of pharmacology and infectious disease experts believes that improved hygiene in homes and community settings is just as important.

The scientists have published a position paper in the American Journal of Infection Control on behalf of the Global Hygiene Council.

“Although global and national [antimicrobial resistance] action plans are in place,” they write, “infection prevention and control is primarily discussed in the context of healthcare facilities with home and everyday life settings barely addressed.”

They have also launched a manifesto that calls on health policymakers to recognize the importance of this topic.

‘More urgent than ever’

Simple hygiene measures, such as hand washing, can help reduce infections and antibiotic use, the authors argue. In turn, this will minimize the development of resistance.

“In light of the current COVID-19 pandemic and evidence presented in this paper, it is more urgent than ever for policymakers to recognize the role of community hygiene to minimize the spread of infections, which, in turn, will help in reducing the consumption of antibiotics and help the fight against [antimicrobial resistance],” says lead author Prof. Jean-Yves Maillard from the School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at Cardiff University in the United Kingdom.

The World Health Organization (WHO) estimate that 35% of common infections are already resistant to currently available medicines, with this figure rising to 80–90% in some low and middle income countries.

Overuse of the drugs accelerates the development of resistance. In the United States, for example, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate that of the 80–90% of antibiotic use that occurs outside hospitals, about half is inappropriate or unnecessary.

The authors point out that while the majority of bacteria that are multidrug-resistant (resistant to at least one agent in three or more antimicrobial classes) get picked up in hospitals, some have become prevalent in the community.

Patients leaving the hospital can carry methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) on their skin, for example, or resistant strains of enterobacteria in their gut. Resistant bacteria can then pass to other family members.

The authors write:

“Although the precise impact of hygiene on transmission of infection between community and healthcare settings needs further investigation, it is important to recognize that reducing the need for antibiotic prescribing and the circulation of [antimicrobial-resistant] strains in healthcare settings cannot be achieved without also reducing circulation of infections and [resistant] strains in the community. We cannot allow hygiene in home and everyday life settings to become the weak link in the chain.”

 

Hand washing is a crucial measure

They argue that better hand hygiene would prevent many infections in the home and in community settings, such as schools, nurseries, and workplaces.

Only about 19% of people wash their hands after using the toilet, according to a review of research that the paper cites. The same review found that hand washing reduces the risk of diarrhea by nearly one-quarter (23%) in studies with good methodological design.

Educating people to wash their hands with ordinary soap is one of the best ways to reduce infections, according to experts. Overall, research has shown that improvements in hand hygiene lead to a 21% reduction in respiratory illnesses and a 31% reduction in gastrointestinal illnesses.

In addition, the position paper highlights the problem of foodborne pathogens, including Salmonella, Campylobacter, and Escherichia coli. These affect millions of people globally every year, causing diarrhea and other debilitating symptoms.

A 2014 study in Mexico found Salmonella in almost all cleaning cloths. Soaking these dish clothes in a 2% solution of bleach twice a day reduced the bacteria by 98%.

Key risks and strategies

The authors identify key risk moments for transmitting infections in the home. These are:

• food handling, including contaminated chopping boards and kitchen sponges
• using the toilet
• changing a baby’s diaper
• coughing, sneezing, and nose blowing
• touching surfaces that others frequently touch
• handling and laundering clothing and household linen
caring for domestic animals
• disposing of refuse
• caring for an infected family member

As key strategies to combat infection in the home, they recommend:

• soap or detergent-based cleaning together with adequate rinsing
• alcohol-based hand sanitizer
• inactivation or eradication using a disinfectant on hard surfaces
• mechanical removal using dry wiping
• heating to at least 60°C (140°F)
• UV treatment
• a combination of the above

However, they note that further research is necessary to evaluate the extent to which these practices might contribute to preventing the transmission of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria.

____________________________________

Written by James Kingsland on May 25, 2020 – Fact checked by Hilary Guite, FFPH, MRCGP

Published: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com


Coronavirus & Water Pandemics: Doing the Math

As the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic spreads, guidance on how wash your hands and other measures intensifies.

These recommendations are important, but they are hardly of value to the 40% of humanity lacking access to even the most basic hand washing requirements — soap and water 1.

In most African countries or India, the proportion is even higher – between 50% and 80% of the population.

Even many health centres lack facilities for hand hygiene and safe segregation and disposal of health care waste 2.

In the Least Developed Countries (LDCs), basic water services are absent in 55% of health centers, used by an estimated 900 million people — more than the population of the USA and Europe combined.

More than 1 million deaths each year – newborns and mothers – are associated with unclean births. Overall, poor sanitation and a lack of safe drinking water take the lives of an estimated 4.3 million people annually 3.

This ongoing health crisis — a “water illness pandemic” in all but official definition — has been around for generations but, unlike COVID-19, hardly makes a ripple in international news.

It is unfair to say nothing has been done about it, but progress is so slow 4 5 that many members of vulnerable groups are likely to continue dying without ever having known what it means to have clean water within a five minute walk, much less a home tap.

Since the year 2000, this hidden water pandemic has quietly killed more people than World War II 6.

And it is on pace to kill over 40 million more — roughly equal to the population of Canada — in the next 10 years, by which time the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) of the UN’s Agenda 2030 are supposed to have been met.

Those 17 goals include one that aims to “ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all.”

During the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) crisis of 2002-2003, nearly 8,100 people were infected and nearly 800 died. COVID-19 is much less deadly but has already infected 25 times as many people. So, human losses are now over 10 times more than those due to SARS and they keep growing.

Be that as it may, even as COVID-19 takes more lives in the remainder of 2020 despite all efforts of health care providers, and all the measures already taken by governments around the world, the toll will almost surely be dwarfed by the four million people likely to die this year from the lack of safe WAter, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH).

And the water pandemic deaths will not make headlines.

Those who die due to the water pandemic are, naturally, poor. They do not trade or travel internationally, they do not have mortgages, they do not buy insurance. Callous world financial markets pay little attention.

The ongoing water pandemic is even more distressing because many prerequisites for eradicating it already exist. We know how many people do not have WASH, and we know where they live. We even know precisely what to do — the technologies needed are available, including low-cost ones.

The problem is primarily a lack of political will and finance, and each, of course, connects to the other.

The water pandemic is not particularly “sexy,” nor visible in the myriad of other problems that many countries face. Even a decent politician who makes it a priority issue will likely be distracted within her or his term.

As for financing, about 20 years ago we needed an estimated USD 24 billion per year on average over 10 years to bring low-cost, safe water and sanitation to all those who needed it then (inclusive of population growth) 7.

That was probably an underestimate, but even that number was never met. And the shortfall of some USD 17 billion was about equal to annual pet food purchases in Europe and USA…

The absolute numbers required now have not changed much — roughly USD 28 billion per year (from 2015 to 2030) to extend basic WASH services to all those unserved 8. With “safely managed” “continuously available,” and “improved” services, the annual requirement rises to USD 114 billion. Yet, four years into the SDG era, we have not been able to meet the required financing levels even for basic services.

To meet the goals by 2030, we will, naturally, need more in the remaining decade, but it is difficult to express optimism that this will be achieved, even though the investment required represents just around 3% of NATO’s total annual military spending.

It would also be naive to think that suddenly the world would focus entirely on the water pandemic.

And, let’s face it, resolving a big development problem like the lack of WASH requires political stability and the absence of corruption, neither of which is the case in many of the most acute problem areas. So, most likely and unfortunately, progress will only continue slowly.

Can today’s coronavirus crisis “help” accelerate this progress? It might, if the virus seriously hits the countries with low levels of WASH and that, in turn, elevates even higher the risks and levels of infection in wealthier countries.

Only then funds might flow, motivated by self-interest of the world’s most fortunate people. The world really needs to “internalize” caring about the lack of WASH to resolve it. One wonders if it ever will.

So, for the time being, at the very least, stay safe from COVID-19 yourself. Wipe your desk and wash your hands, if you are lucky enough to have water.

1   www.washdata.org
2   https://www.who.int/water_sanitation_health/publications/wash-in-health-care-facilities-global-report/en/
3   https://www.voanews.com/archive/who-waterborne-disease-worlds-leading-killer
4   https://www.unwater.org/publication_categories/sdg-6-synthesis-report-2018-on-water-and-sanitation/
5   https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/content/documents/24978Report_of_the_SG_on_SDG_Progress_2019.pdf
6   https://courses.lumenlearning.com/suny-hccc-worldhistory2/chapter/casualties-of-world-war-ii/
7   http://archive.unu.edu/env/water/2000-waterday.html
8   Hutton, G. and Varughese, M. (2016) The Costs of Meeting the 2030 Sustainable Development Goal Targets on Drinking Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene. Summary Report. World Bank Group, 11 pp

 

This article is to commemorate World Water Day on March 22

Vladimir Smakhtin is Director of the UN University Institute for Water, Environment and Health, funded by the Government of Canada and hosted by McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario.


By Vladimir Smakhtin

Published HAMILTON, Canada, Mar 19 2020 (IPS)
http://www.ipsnews.net


Hand hygiene a key defence in Europe’s fight against antibiotic resistance

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR), and resistance to antibiotics in particular, continues to grow in the WHO European Region and hundreds of thousands of patients die or are considerably affected each year by health care-associated infections (HAI) and diseases caused by germs that are resistant to antimicrobial medicines.

This year’s SAVE LIVES: Clean Your Hands campaign on 5 May uses the slogan “Fight antibiotic resistance – it’s in your hands” to highlight the fact that health-care workers and the public have a responsibility to prevent and control AMR and HAI, in turn helping to prevent related complications and deaths.

It is estimated that 7–10% of patients will acquire at least one HAI at any given time under treatment. A large percentage of these are preventable by improving hand hygiene practices and other infection prevention and control measures.

Taking action from many sides

HAI, including those resistant to antibiotics, are among the most common adverse events in health care delivery. Such infections can impact quality of life and lead to serious disease or even death. Action across all sectors of society is required to effectively prevent AMR. The following key recommendations will help prevent the spread of AMR and protect people in the Region from HAI:

• Health workers must clean their hands at the right times (see below).
• Chief executive officers and managers of health facilities need to support hand hygiene campaigning and infection prevention and control (IPC) programmes.
• IPC leaders should champion hand hygiene campaigns and comply with WHO’s “core components” for IPC.
• Policy-makers should stop the spread of AMR by demonstrating national support for and commitment to infection prevention programmes.

Cleaning hands at the right times

Protecting patients against HAI can be achieved by improving hand hygiene at five key moments, preferably by using an alcohol-based rub or by hand washing with soap and water if hands are visibly dirty. The “five moments” for hand hygiene comprise:

• before patient contact
• before preparing and administering injections
• after contact with body fluids
• after patient contact
• after touching patient surroundings.

Reinforcing the importance of hand hygiene through policy-making

Making infection prevention and hand hygiene a national policy priority by aligning and strengthening existing programmes will go far in combating AMR and protecting patients from resistant infections.

National authorities should implement or reinvigorate any or all of the following options according to the new WHO recommendations on core components for IPC programmes:

• establish a national IPC programme linked with other relevant national programmes and professional organizations;
• ensure that any national IPC programme supports the education and training of the health workforce as one of its core functions;
• establish an HAI surveillance programme and networks that include mechanisms for timely data feedback;
• consider hand hygiene as a key national performance indicator providing vital feedback data on health-care practices;
• have a system in place to ensure patient care activities are undertaken in a clean and/or hygienic, well-equipped environment to prevent and control HAI.

 

Building momentum in the fight against antibiotic resistance

This year’s campaign builds important momentum ahead of World Antibiotic Awareness Week (WAAW), which takes place on 13–19 November 2017. WAAW encourages all countries, health partners and the public to help raise awareness of AMR and to emphasize that we all have a part to play in preserving the effectiveness of antimicrobial medicines.

 

By WHO Europe
Publihed May 4th 2017
http://www.euro.who.int